Use PDFix to manually tag your PDF.

You can watch the linked video for a step-by-step explanation of the entire process.

Ensuring that your PDF is properly tagged is crucial when creating an accessible document. PDFix allows you to manually add tags to your document and, therefore, ensure its compliance with accessibility standards.

After loading your document into PDFix, make sure to open the tags panel to view the tag tree and keep track of the tagging process. 

PDFix offers various tools for selecting existing objects in your PDF, all of them located in the main panel. We recommend using the Object tool when creating most of your tags, since it automatically selects existing objects in your document with a simple click of a button. 

Tagging a heading

With the object tool selected, you are ready to tag the first object – a heading. Left-click on the heading text, which selects the entire object, then right-click and select Tag As H1. Your first tag is complete! You can use this method to tag the rest of your headings.

Tagging a heading as H2 with the object tool selected (on the top)

Tagging a heading as H2 with the object tool selected (on the top)

Tagging a paragraph

Let’s continue by tagging a paragraph. As with other known editors, PDFix offers three different ways of selecting the objects in your document. First is a simple left-click, which was used to select an object in your PDF when tagging the initial headings. If you want to select more than just a simple object – for example, an entire paragraph – you can do so in two ways.
You can either select the text with the press of the left button and drag your mouse whilst the pointer is positioned over the desired object, or you can use a simple drag rectangle around it.
We can use one of these selections to select the following paragraph and, once again, right-click and press Tag as text. 

Tagging a paragraph with the entire text selected

Tagging a paragraph with the entire text selected

Tagging a list

PDFix makes it easy to tag more complicated structures, such as lists or tables, using a single button click. The process of tagging a list is no different from tagging a simple paragraph. Select the list, right-click and simply select Tag as List.
When tagging an object, the program automatically creates sub-tags based on the structure of the element. For example, when tagging a list, PDFix automatically creates the proper subtags, along with distinguishing and separating the numbering from the text of the list.

Tagged list with the tag structure shown in the tags panel (on the left)

Tagged list with the tag structure shown in the tags panel (on the left)

Proper tag placement

When tagging your document, remember to check the tag panel regularly to ensure that your created tag tree is complete and in the proper order. A newly generated tag will always be placed after the currently selected tag.
If a new tag is misplaced, you can simply drag and drop it into its proper position in the tag tree.

Lastly, make sure to remember to tag the headers and footers properly. These operations mark the objects as artefacts, and therefore, your footers and headers are not in the tags panel.

Splitting an object into multiple tags

So far, we have only used the object tool. If you want to split an object into multiple tags, you can do so using the default tool. This tool allows you to select the text by single letters instead of individual objects. It can prove useful when tagging a part of the paragraph in a different way than the rest.

Tagging a specific part of the text using the default tool (on the top)

Tagging a specific part of the text using the default tool (on the top)

You can use the methods above to tag any object or structure present in your pdf.
PDFix also offers a specialized table tool, which can be used if you are unhappy with the results when tagging your tables. This tool will be further introduced in the following videos and blog posts.

If your document is too long to tag manually, you can take advantage of the possibility of automatically tagging your PDF. Watch our Autotag video or read the related blog post to learn more. If your automatic tagging process results are incorrect, you can follow our further blog posts to learn how to fix wrong tags.